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Don't buy from Icelandic whalers


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#1 AnimuX

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 01:43 PM

http://www.dontbuyfr...dicwhalers.com/

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By the 1980s, whale populations had been decimated by over-hunting. In response the International Whaling Commission (IWC) imposed a ban on commercial whaling in 1982, which went into effect in 1986. Most countries complied with the ban, but Iceland returned to commercial whaling in 2006 and has killed 414 endangered fin whales and 430 minke whales (331 for commercial purposes and 99 for scientific "research") since then. In December 2013, the government of Iceland issued a new five-year quota for fins and minkes, under which it could slaughter nearly 2,000 whales.

Iceland's domestic market for whale meat is small; it exports most of the whale meat and blubber to Japan, defying another international treaty, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), that bans international commercial trade in whale products.

There are direct links between Iceland's whaling industry and powerful elements of Iceland's fishing industry.  Fish sourced from whaling-linked companies in Iceland is imported into the United States both directly and through third-party sources.

In Europe, conservation and animal protection NGOs have been encouraging the public not to buy fish from whalers, putting pressure on fish suppliers and retailers to ensure they do not source from Icelandic companies linked to whaling. We are now extending this campaign to the United States.
Which Icelandic companies are tied to whaling?

The Hvalur hf company has killed 414 endangered fin whales since 2006 and shipped nearly 3,000 metric tons of fin whale meat, blubber and other products to Japan. In addition to being used in sushi or soups, some of the meat from this magnificent—and endangered—species is used as dog treats.

Individuals and companies that are invested in several Hvalur Group subsidiaries control the majority of shares in HB Grandi, Iceland's leading seafood company. In addition, individuals that manage Hvalur Group companies are also key players in HB Grandi's corporate leadership. Kristján Loftsson, who partly owns and manages Hvalur is the chairman of the board of HB Grandi.

The core of the Hvalur Group is made up of Hvalur hf, Fiskhlutfelagið Venus, Vogun, Vænting, HB Grandi, and Hampiðjan. Each of these companies have several subsidiaries. Several Hvalur Group companies export seafood and other products to the United States.

HB Grandi: key to Iceland's fin whaling

HB Grandi, the largest seafood company in Iceland, holds 12% of the country's fishing quotas, including for redfish, cod, Greenland halibut, haddock, saithe, mackerel and herring. It owns numerous vessels and operates several fish processing plants at which it also produces fish meal and fish oil.
Fin whale meat is transported by truck from the Hvalur whaling station to Akranes, where it is cut, packaged, boxed and made ready for export in HB Grandi facilities. Hvalur most recently exported  whale products in January 2014, to Japan via Canada.
Iceland Seafood International (ISI), High Liner Foods and Sysco

While many of the companies importing from the Hvalur Group are not household names, there are a few companies that are well known.  For example, while not a member of the Hvalur Group, Iceland Seafood International (ISI) has admitted to purchasing seafood from HB Grandi. High Liner Foods, one of the largest seafood companies in North America, began to import frozen fish from HB Grandi into the United States in October of 2013.
High Liner Foods is also a known supplier to Sysco, the food service giant, as is Marky's, a company that has imported fish roes from Vignir G. Jónsson, a wholly-owned subsidiary of HB Grandi.
What you can do

Consumer Pressure

If you buy seafood, ask your local supermarket, big-box store, wholesale club or restaurant to verify that their seafood products do not come from a source linked to Icelandic whaling. Refer them to this website if they have questions. If they cannot guarantee to you that they are not "whaling free," hold off buying from them until they can. Consider writing to a company's customer service department and ask them for assurances that their product is not linked to Iceland's whale hunt. You can find a list of seafood retailers' websites here.
Political Pressure

Both the Secretaries of Commerce and Interior have declared that Iceland is diminishing the effectiveness of the international bans on whaling and trade in whale products.

Under a law known as the Pelly Amendment to the Fishermen's Protective Act, President Obama can now impose economic measures against Iceland including trade sanctions against companies linked to whaling. But more pressure is needed to convince him.

What You Can Do to Help

Send a message to President Obama urging him to impose trade sanctions and other measures against Iceland: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact
Write to Iceland's ambassador to the United States, politely expressing your opposition to Iceland's whaling policy:  Ambassador Gudmundur Stefansson at icemb.wash@utn.stjr.is or by mail to: Embassy of Iceland, Washington D.C., House of Sweden, 2900 K Street N.W. #509, Washington DC 20007-1704

Write your letter!

Coalition Partners

A number of animal welfare and conservation groups have partnered to present this information. All are members of the WhalesNeedUS coalition of US non-governmental organizations working to end the commercial slaughter of whales.

“Anything else you are interested in is not going to happen if you can’t breathe the air and drink the water. Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolute critical moment in the history of our planet.” -- Carl Sagan

#2 SeaShepherd fan BY

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 09:54 PM

And why would anyone who likes the sea want to eat fish in the first place?

#3 Shane-O

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 10:14 PM

View PostSeaShepherd fan BY, on 16 March 2014 - 09:54 PM, said:

And why would anyone who likes the sea want to eat fish in the first place?
Some of us are not vegetarian or vegan and believe that eating animals from mother nature can be done humanely and sustainably...
Not all conservationists are animal rights activists... ill eat fish, but only what I catch myself...
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#4 TheCauseEndures

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 11:52 PM

But so much fish is toxic that is shouldn't be eaten by anyone.

#5 Shane-O

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:14 AM

View PostTheCauseEndures, on 16 March 2014 - 11:52 PM, said:

But so much fish is toxic that is shouldn't be eaten by anyone.
depends on where you fish. areas around my homeland are still pristine and unspoiled by industrialization. salmon and trout are especially clean as inland Newfoundland has never been settled or polluted by mankind. breathtaking experience.
-stupidity ain't a virus, but it sure do spread like one :P
-Do keyboards come with "SLAP" buttons?
-Don't post online what you wouldn't say in everyday life